Have a very berry autumn

I love autumn. Love the crisp mornings and smoky dusks. Love the usually fine weather during the day. Love the colours changing and the nights drawing in. Most of all, though, I love the feast that Nature provides for us in the form of berries, nuts, fungi and other fruit. For the second day running, I’ve been out for a walk and come back clutching just under a kilo of fresh blackberries.  In case you imagine me madly juggling purple handfuls, I am the sort of person who goes out for a walk with a couple of freezer bags stashed in my pocket for exactly this purpose. I know…. Seamus Heaney describes the joy of blackberrying beautifully in his poem, Blackberry Picking

“Late August, given heavy rain and sun
For a full week, the blackberries would ripen.
At first, just one, a glossy purple clot
Among others, red, green, hard as a knot.
You ate that first one and its flesh was sweet
Like thickened wine: summer’s blood was in it
Leaving stains upon the tongue and lust for
Picking. ”

patch   Close up 1

This year, the abundance of berries is positively overwhelming. I live in a suburb of South Liverpool, not quite the Italian smallholding of my dreams, yet I can locate kilos of blackberries within a 10minute walk. The glory of the blackberry haul is a reason to be grateful for the moratorium on tidying up the edges of parks and cemeteries due to budget cuts. Good for us. Good for wildlife too.  If you are out blackberrying this week, remember the forager’s rule: don’t pick it all, leave plenty for others, including wildlife to enjoy.

I turned my first kilo of blackberries into blackberry curd – a variation on a theme first explored this year using the lovely strawberries from Claremont Farm (see Strawberry Delight post). I plan to ask my neighbours (nicely) for a few of their apples, and make my favourite ever crumble – Apple and Blackberry with the rest.

Recipes below:

blackb curd

Blackberry Curd

400g blackberries, rinsed in cold water to remove any occupants and well drained

Juice and zest of 1 orange

Juice and zest of 1 lemon

500g caster sugar

200g unsalted butter

300ml of beaten free range eggs (about 5)

First whizz the blackberries in a food processor to make a puree.  Add the juice and zest of the citrus fruits. In a microwavable bowl, combine the butter, sugar and blackberry mix. Heat in the microwave on full for 2 to 3 minutes until the butter has melted. Stir well and then pour in the beaten eggs. Microwave again on high, in bursts of 1 minute, stirring each time, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon (you should be able to run your finger down and leave a line). Pour the mixture through a sieve to remove the blackberry seeds, and any bits of cooked egg that may have sneaked through. Pot into hot sterilized jars and store in the fridge once cool. Use to top homemade scones, swirl into Greek style yogurt, fill a cake or just spoon onto toast.

 

Apple and Blackberry Crumble

400g blackberries, rinsed and drained

3 large cooking apples, peeled and sliced

175g demerara sugar

Topping:

175g cold unsalted butter

100g demerara sugar

100g plain flour

125g rolled or jumbo oats

Preheat oven to 200C/180C fan/400F/ GM6

Toss the apple slices, blackberries and 175g of sugar together into a large pie or lasagne dish.

Cut butter into small chunks and then use the tip of your fingers to rub it into the  topping mix of flour, oats and sugar until it all resembles breadcrumbs. Sprinkle this over the fruit in an even layer and bake for 45 minutes until the top is brown and the fruit is beginning to bubble through.

Let it cool for a few minutes, then serve with thick cream, custard or vanilla ice cream.

4 thoughts on “Have a very berry autumn

    • Dear Laurence,

      Thank you for the compliment, be happy to enter the competition!

      Best wishes,

      Lucy

  1. Good to know I am not alone on picking blackberries:)
    Unfortunately this year, due to the extreme hot summer temperatures (40ºC), most of the blackberries are small and dry.
    Never thought on making curd with them, but it sounds delicious.

    • Thanks Teresa. If they’re a bit small and dry, try making a jelly out of them with apples to give a bit of body.

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